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The truth about diet and exercise

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Conway Hall

25 Red Lion Square

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WC1R 4RL

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New Scientist takes you behind the headlines to delve into what science really has to say about diet and exercise

About this Event

For people interested in healthy living, the world can be a confusing place. Diet and exercise fads come and go, health advice changes and foods that were good for you last week are suddenly bad for you - and there are hundreds if not thousands of magazines, newspaper articles and self-improvement books all claiming to know the one true path to a better you.

Let New Scientist help you cut through the confusion as you join professor of cardiometabolic health Jason Gill and geneticist Giles Yeo for an evening exploring the facts behind the headlines about exercise and diet.

Talks:

The truth about diets

Giles Yeo

Each New Year brings new diets and health fads. But what actually works? Leading geneticist Giles Yeo explores how to break the cycle of pseudo-science and misinformation surrounding the world of dieting. Join Giles as he examines the truths and fallacies in the claims made by popular diets including the Palaeolithic and clean movements, takes a closer look at our obsession with calorie counting and argues why we shouldn’t fear food.

Giles Yeo is a geneticist with nearly 20 years’ experience studying obesity and the brain control of food intake. He obtained his PhD from the University of Cambridge in genetics in 1998 and his current research focuses on why some people are lean and some obese, and the influence of genes is our feeding behaviour. Giles is also a broadcaster and author, presenting science documentaries for the BBC’s Horizon and Trust Me I’m A Doctor series. His first book Gene Eating: The Science of Obesity and the Truth About Diets was published in December 2018.

The truth about exercise

Jason Gill

Should we all be hitting the gym three times a week, doing yoga, HIIT training or simply getting in our 10,000 step per day? With new exercise fads cropping up, seemingly, by the week, how are we supposed to know what to do to stay healthy? In this talk, Jason Gill reveals what science can really tell us about how to move more and exercise, to maximise our chances of a healthy life.

Jason Gill is professor of exercise and metabolic health at the University of Glasgow. His research investigates the effects of exercise and diet on the prevention and management of disease. He is passionate about communicating the science of physical activity, diet, obesity and cardio-metabolic risk to the widest possible audience, including a number of appearances on TV documentaries and events for the general public.

Booking information:

The event will be held at Conway Hall, 25 Red Lion Square, Holborn, London WC1R 4RL

Doors will open at 6.30pm with talks commencing at 7.00 pm. The event will finish at 9.00pm.

Eventbrite will email you your ticket(s) immediately after purchase. Please remember to bring your ticket with you as you'll need it to gain entry. We can scan tickets from a print out, or off the screen of a phone / tablet / smartwatch.

Should you require details about disabled access, please contact us at: Live@newscientist.com

Tickets are non-transferable to any other New Scientist event.

All tickets are non-refundable.

New Scientist Ltd reserves the right to alter the event and its line-up, or cancel the event. In the unlikely event of cancellation, all tickets will be fully refunded. Neither New Scientist nor its parent company will be liable for any additional expenses incurred by ticket holders in relation to the event.

Tickets are subject to availability and are only available in advance through Eventbrite. To secure your place we recommend you book in advance, however if tickets are still available you can purchase on the door.

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Conway Hall

25 Red Lion Square

London

WC1R 4RL

United Kingdom

View Map

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