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The YTL Centre for Politics, Philosophy and Law presents a KCrim workshop:...

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SW1.18, Somerset House East Wing, Dickson Poon School of Law

King's College London

Strand

London

WC2R 2LS

United Kingdom

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'Criminalising Sex with Animals' by Professor Stuart Green, Rutgers Law School, New Jersey

A KCrim Workshop hosted by Prof. Andrew Simester, King's College London.

Bestiality has traditionally been conceptualized as a “crime against nature” or a form of “unnatural carnal copulation,” and, as such, classified alongside offenses like sodomy and adult incest. Given the disfavor into which such “moralistic” offenses have fallen, the question arises whether prohibitions on bestiality (or, less pejoratively, “zoophilia”) can survive under a “liberal” theory of criminalisation, according to which criminal sanctions can be justified only when they will efficiently prevent harms or wrongs (or possibly “offense”) to others (or possibly self). To answer that question, we need to consider both whether animals can be harmed and morally wronged, and the function that the harm and wrong principles are meant to play in a liberal society. In particular, we need to ask if, as with core sexual offenses such as rape and sexual assault, bestiality always or usually involves “nonconsensual” sex. And, even if bestiality does involve nonconsensual sex, is there any coherent liberal justification for criminalising such conduct while so many other serious nonconsensual harms to animals (including with respect to animals’ sexual functions) go unrestricted? Relevant here is whether bestiality fits within the narrow sliver of animal mistreatment that is sufficiently “cruel” to justify criminalization?

Date: 22/05/17
Time: 4:00pm - 6:00pm
Venue: SW1.18, 1st Floor, Somerset House East Wing, Strand Campus, King's College London



Biography:

Professor Stuart Green received a B.A. in philosophy from Tufts University and a J.D. from Yale Law School, where he was a notes editor of the Yale Law Journal. After law school, he clerked for Judge Pamela Ann Rymer of the U.S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in Los Angeles and then served as an associate with the law firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering in Washington, DC. Prior to joining the Rutgers faculty, Green taught at the Louisiana State University Law School.

Green’s books – which have been translated, in whole or in part, into Spanish, Italian, Russian, Turkish, and Korean – include the award-winning Lying, Cheating, and Stealing: A Moral Theory of White Collar Crime (2006); Thirteen Ways to Steal a Bicycle: Theft Law in the Information Age (2012); and Philosophical Foundations of Criminal Law (co-edited with Antony Duff) (2011). He is currently working on a new book, titled Criminalizing Sex, which will offer a “unified” theory of the non-consensual and consensual sexual offenses.

The recipient of fellowships from the U.K. Leverhulme Trust and U.S.-U.K. Fulbright Commission, Green has served as a visiting professor or visiting fellow at the Universities of Oxford, Michigan, Melbourne, Glasgow, and Tel Aviv, and the Australian National University. He is serving for a total of six months during 2016 and 2017 as a visiting professor at the London School of Economics.

Professor Green is a founding co-editor of Criminal Law and Criminal Justice Books, a former consultant to the Law Commission for England and Wales, and a frequent media commentator on issues in criminal law and ethics.

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SW1.18, Somerset House East Wing, Dickson Poon School of Law

King's College London

Strand

London

WC2R 2LS

United Kingdom

View Map

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