Free

Transnational Morrison

Actions and Detail Panel

Free

Event Information

Share this event

Date and time

Location

Location

Online event

Event description
A talk about the concept of author Toni Morrison as a transnational figure will be the final event of the Black Female Intellectuals series.

About this event

Titled ‘Transnational Morrison’, the online talk will be delivered by Associate Professor Dr Hilary Emmett from the School of Art, Media, and American Studies at the University of East Anglia (UEA). The event will be chaired by Dr Nicole King, Lecturer in English and Creative Writing at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Dr Emmett’s talk will offer a reading of Nobel Laureate and Pulitzer-prize winning author and essayist, Toni Morrison, as a public intellectual of not only international standing but as a transnational figure. She will explore the ways in which Morrison not only achieved international recognition for her fiction and non-fiction writing in her lifetime, but that her ways of writing and conceptualising race have permeated the work of other Black authors and public intellectuals around the globe.

In particular, the paper will focus on the work of women writers and artists of Indigenous Australian and Australian South Sea Islander (ASSI) descent by reading their novels and artworks through the lens of Morrison’s creative and critical writings. Dr Emmett will examine their explorations of anti-Black racism in Australia and consider the ways in which the resonances of Morrison’s work in theirs may be understood not simply as aesthetic influence, but as a political move that draws attention to the structural similarities between Australia and the United States in relation to histories of anti-Black racism, coerced labour, and incarceration.

The ultimate aim of the talk is to offer some strategies for comparison such that texts by Indigenous Australian and ASSI women become commonplace on the curriculum in American studies and beyond.

The talk will be followed by an opportunity for a question and answer session.

Dr Hilary Emmett joined UEA in 2012, having studied and taught at universities in Australia and the USA. Her research engages a variety of fields from the rhetoric of sisterhood in the Early American Republic to nineteenth and twentieth century children's literature. Her current teaching and research focus is on the Transpacific relationships of literatures of the United States and Australia and includes a co-authored project, with Assoc. Prof. Clare Corbould (Deakin University), on Australian Afterlives of Atlantic Slavery.

Dr Nicole King was appointed by Goldsmiths in 2017, having previously been Lecturer in American and Caribbean literature at the University of Reading, visiting lecturer at Brunel University, Associate Professor of African American and Caribbean literature at the University of California, San Diego, and Assistant Professor of African American and Caribbean literature at the University of Maryland. Dr King is the author of C.L.R. James and Creolization: Circles of Influence (University Press of Mississippi, 2001) and is currently writing Black Childhood in Modern African American Fiction (2022) which is under contract with Edinburgh University Press. 

She has published essays on African American identities and literature, detective fiction, Caribbean literature, Black British fiction and teaching literature in higher education. In 2019 she appeared on the BBC Two television series, ‘Novels That Shaped Our World’ and served as the historical consultant on the acclaimed London production of Death of a Salesman.’ Since 2014 she has been a Trustee and Fellow of the English Association and she serves on the board of Moon Lane Ink, a not-for-profit company dedicated to raising equality in children’s books.

The talk takes place online at 4pm on Wednesday 19 May. Event attendees will be emailed a link to follow the day before the event. To register your attendance, visit the Eventbrite page before 9am on 18 May. The event will be recorded for use by the project online afterwards.

The Black Female Intellectuals in Historical and Contemporary Context project, led by Dr Rebecca Fraser (UEA) and Dr Imaobong Umoren (LSE), aims to bring together interdisciplinary and cross-national dialogue among scholars and activists in the fields of literary studies, history, politics, and visual culture from the UK, US, Australia, Europe, the Caribbean and Africa working on transatlantic black female intellectuals (both from an historical and contemporary perspective) in the black diaspora.

Share with friends

Date and time

Location

Online event

Save This Event

Event Saved