Sales Ended

Unlocking the Potential: How our understanding of communication difficultie...

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

NIASW

Douglas House

397 Ormeau Road

Belfast, BT7 3GP

View Map

Refund Policy

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 30 days before event

Friends Who Are Going
Event description

Description

In the UK, over 1 million children and young people, that’s 2-3 in every UK classroom, have some form of long term and persistent speech, language and communication difficulty. This can affect them early, severely and for life.

In areas of poverty, over 50% of children are starting school with delayed communication skills. Their speech may be unclear, vocabulary is smaller, sentences are shorter and they are able to understand only simple instructions. A landmark US research found that by the age of 4 a child in a professional family has experienced 45 million words. A child in a family receiving welfare support has experienced 13 million words.

Furthermore, young people with Speech, Language and Communication Needs (SLCN) are more likely to have had an adverse childhood, for example through neglect or poor parenting, and are therefore more likely to have reduced resilience to stressful events. This is compounded by the fact that language skills are important for reflection and the expression of emotions, all of which are crucial activities to help develop individual resilience. Left untreated, around one third of young people with SLCN are estimated to go on to develop mental health problems.

What is the impact of long term communication difficulties?

  • Two thirds of 7-14 year olds with serious behaviour problems have language impairment.

  • Young people with SLCN experience low self-esteem and distress in the classroom, which often increases throughout the school years.

  • Young people with SLCN are often marginalised from a young age.

  • At least 60% of young people in young offender institutions have communication difficulties.

  • Those with a history of early language impairment are at higher risk of mental health problems.

  • SLCN interferes with the ability to form positive, prosocial relationships or to engage in meaningful activity such as employment, which reduces the likelihood of the young person themselves creating the right environment for desistance.

It is therefore not surprising that studies have found that early developmental language problems in young males can predict antisocial behaviour in adolescence or early adulthood.

Research has found that professionals who have been trained to assess young people for such problems are able to better understand the myriad of behavioural issues that are being presented.

This has an impact not only on the individual, their family and their community, but also more widely, as it has been estimated that a 16 year old male with untreated SLCN would cost the public purse more than £153,000 in terms of interventions and periods in secure care, compared to the limited costs of awareness raising and increased capabilities among professionals and educators.

This training is open to all professionals who work with children, young people and families. It will:

  • Raise awareness among social workers of this hidden problem.

  • Enable social workers to think differently about why children present with interaction and communication obstacles.

  • Encourage and support social workers to consider how trauma and childhood adversity can impact on communication.

  • Consider the appropriateness of talking based therapies and programmes for children experiencing such communication obstacles.

  • Assist social workers to consider the use of alternative communication methodologies to maintain co-production values with children who have SLCN.

  • Increase the confidence of social workers across all programmes of care in their communication with children and young adults experiencing communication difficulties.

  • Provide Social workers with methods to assess the difficulties and work more effectively with children who have SLCN.

The trainer is Orlaith McGibbon, an independent NISCC registered social worker. With a career spanning over 20 years she has developed a specialist interest in the areas of youth justice and intimate personal violence.

With a background as a Probation Officer with the Probation Board for Northern Ireland’s Youth Offending Services Orlaith moved in 2004 to the Youth Justice Agency to pursue the development of youth conferencing. Delivering on the first statutory restorative justice sanctions for young people Orlaith contributed to the development and strategic scope of the Youth Justice Agency in her role as Assistant Director until 2015.

Orlaith is currently working internationally and has since 2015 worked on several projects with a family violence NGO in Christchurch, New Zealand.

Presently, Orlaith is working across the Middle East and North Africa providing consultancy and training provision to assist the commissioning governments with UN compliance and modernisation programmes of youth justice practices.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

NIASW

Douglas House

397 Ormeau Road

Belfast, BT7 3GP

View Map

Refund Policy

Refunds up to 30 days before event

Save This Event

Event Saved