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Unrest - Film Screening

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Location

Eldon Building LT 1.11

University of Portsmouth

Winston Churchill Avenue

Portsmouth

PO1 2DJ

United Kingdom

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No Refunds

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ME Foggy Dog is proud to be hosting a screening of this award-winning, groundbreaking film. The film documents the lives of people, including Jennifer Brea (creator/director of Unrest), who suffer from the severest form of M.E (Myalgic Encephalomyelitis). These are people you will not see in every day life as they are often bedridden or housebound for years, if not decades. M.E is an invisible illness and sufferers are invisible from society.

I would like a wide range of people to view this film. Sufferers, support networks, the general public and healthcare professionals. Members of healthcare professions receive ZERO training on M.E in medical school and so would benefit from seeing M.E in it's truest form. Please come along to the screening and have your eyes well and truly opened.

Everybody knows somebody with M.E. It is an illness that is massively misunderstood and underestimated. 250,000 people suffer from M.E here in the UK and 17 million (low estimate) are suffering worldwide.

I must thank the University of Portsmouth for very kindly allowing me to use their state-of-the-art lecture theatre for this event. I must also thank the Eldon Coffee Shop who are extending their opening hours specifically to cater for attendees of the Unrest screening. Please note: Food and drink are not permitted inside the lecture theatre. Any refreshments purchased at the coffee shop must be consumed prior to entering.

Doors open at 18.00. I will introduce the film before starting the screening at 18.30. I will be available for questions for a short time after the film finishes.

The Unrest team and the University of Portsmouth have kindly allowed ME Foggy Dog to use the event as a fundraIsing opportunity to raise money for ME research (ME Association benefits from all money raised by ME Foggy Dog). You will have the opportunity to donate during the evening, or purchase Foggy's merchandise, if you are inclined to do so.

The ticket fee has been set to cover costs (licence, insurance, fees). However, any leftover money will go into Foggy's Fund for M.E research.

Hopefully see you on November 16th!

Sally Callow

MEFoggyDog.org

Message from Jennifer Brea

Unrest is a personal documentary. When I was 28, I became ill after a high fever and, eventually, bedridden. At first, doctors couldn't diagnose me and later began telling me that either there was nothing wrong with me or that it was all in my head. As I began searching for answers, I fell down this rabbit hole and discovered a hidden world of thousands of patients all around the globe, many of whom are homebound or bedridden and use the internet to connect with each other and the outside world. We were all grappling with a disease called ME, more commonly known as chronic fatigue syndrome. This wasn?t a disease I had ever really heard of, read about, or seen films made about, even though it is an extremely common condition. It?s a story that?s been flying under the radar for the last 30 years. Unrest follows the story of me and my husband Omar. We are at the very beginning of our marriage, of our lives together, when this asteroid hits. And at the same time, to try to understand what's happening to me, I start reaching out to other patients and documenting their stories. We meet Jessica, a young girl in England who has been bedridden since she was 14, and Ron Davis, a Stanford geneticist who is trying to save his son's life in spite of devastating obstacles. When I first started making this film, it was just an iPhone video diary. Those first few years, I could barely read or write but needed an outlet for my grief and anger. And so I started creating these intimate videos. Then, I went online and met thousands of people, all over the world, living the same experience. Many were homebound or bedbound, isolated, without treatment or care, and often disbelieved. I thought, how could this have possibly happened to so many people? There was this deep social justice issue at the heart of it. An entire community had been ignored by medicine and had missed out on the last 30 years of science. A part of the problem is that many of us are too ill to leave our homes and so doctors and the broader public rarely see us. That is when I decided to make a film. When we began shooting, I was completely bedridden, so I built a global team, hired crews around the world, and directed from my bed. I conducted interviews by Skype and an iPad teleprompter. We had a live feed that (when it worked!) allowed me to see in real time what our DP was shooting on the ground. Filmmaking allowed me to travel again. As we started shooting, and I started to get to know these amazing characters, the film became a way to address some of those burning questions that I had. What kind of a wife can I be to my husband if I can't give him what I want to give? How do I find a path in life now that the plan I had is impossible? If I am never able to leave my bed, what value does my life have? I became interested in what happens not only to patients but to our caregivers when we or a loved one are grappling with a life-changing illness. These are questions we will all face at some point in our lives. Lastly, there was a point at the middle of the edit when we had a very strong cut but I felt unsatisfied with just seeing us, these bodies, from the outside. I knew that there was so much about this experience that an external camera just couldn't capture. So we started bringing in these elements of personal narration, visuals, and sound design in an almost novelistic way, to try to give the audience glimpses of our dreams, our memories. It was important to me to convey that regardless of our profound disabilities, we are all still fully human. That even laying in bed, we have these complex, inner lives. It's my hope that in sharing this world and these people that I have come to profoundly love, we can build a movement to transform the lives of patients with ME; accelerate the search for a cure; and bring a greater level of compassion, awareness, and empathy to millions upon millions of patients and their loved ones wrestling with chronic illness or invisible disabilities.

Jennifer Brea

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Date and Time

Location

Eldon Building LT 1.11

University of Portsmouth

Winston Churchill Avenue

Portsmouth

PO1 2DJ

United Kingdom

View Map

Refund Policy

No Refunds

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