WAX PRINT: 1 Fabric, 4 Continents, 200 Years of History

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Clothworkers North Building LT Cinema (2.31)

School of Media and Communication

University of Leeds

Leeds

LS2 9JT

United Kingdom

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From the villages of Indonesia to the cotton fields of America, from European industrial mills to the bustling markets and sewing schools of West Africa, the story of one fabric and how it came to symbolise a continent, it’s people and their struggle for freedom.

In African homes across the world a benign textile lies unassuming and taken for granted. With a multitude of names from ‘Dutch Wax’ to ‘Liputa' and ‘Kitenge’ to ‘Ankara’ this textile has become an important part of African cultures across the diaspora. A symbol of strength and identity in the face of oppression.

Surprised to learn from her Nigerian grandmother that ‘traditional’ African wax printed fabrics were a colonial invention made in the UK and Holland, British-born filmmaker and fashion designer, Aiwan Obinyan, sets out on a journey across four continents to trace the two-hundred year history of this iconic textile that has come to visually represent Africa and Africans.

The Industrial Revolution. Cotton is king. Mills across Europe spin and weave cotton sourced from North America. Colonialism leads to the discovery of batik in Indonesia. Dutch and English traders copy the designs and industrial innovators mechanise the process leading to the creation of Wax Prints. In the scramble for Africa, Wax prints are brought on merchant ships and sold by missionary trading companies in the bustling markets and village squares of West Africa. Local women are economically and politically empowered by this new import. Business is booming for all. But at what cost?

The late 20th century sees the influx of Chinese counterfeiters flooding the market with cheap copies (?), business declines and one by one the big Wax Print companies close their doors. From this decline emerges a new cottage industry, where designers reclaim the means of production in their homes, studios and local communities.

But when all is said and done, is Wax Print African? And who gets to decide?

Followed by a Q&A with Director: Aiwan Obinyan.

Director biography

Aiwan Obinyan is a Nigerian-British, Filmmaker, Composer and Fashion Designer.

She has worked in the film and music industries, as a musician, studio engineer, composer and filmmaker. Her work has appeared on national and international TV and in 2013 she founded AiAi Studios a music production
and audio post-production company specialising in music for Film & TV, sound design, editing and dubbing mixing.

Location: Please note that the talk takes place in the Clothworkers North Building LT Cinema (2.31), School of Media and Communication, University of Leeds.

Part of Resists: exploring resist-dyed textiles across cultures exhibition programme.

This event is co-hosted and sponsored by Leeds University Centre for African Studies.

FAQs

What are my transport/parking options for getting to and from the event?

For information on how to get to this the University of Leeds by foot, public transport or car visit our website.

What about visitor access?

Clothworkers North Building LT (Cinema) (2.31) is fully accessible, and there are accessible toilets adjacent.

Do I have to bring my printed ticket to the event?

It is not necessary to bring a printed ticket. Simply tell us your name on the door.

How can I contact the organiser with any questions?

If you have any questions about attending this event please contact Kerstin Doble, Learning and Engagement Officer: Email ulita@leeds.ac.uk or phone ULITA on 0113 343 3919.

Date and Time

Location

Clothworkers North Building LT Cinema (2.31)

School of Media and Communication

University of Leeds

Leeds

LS2 9JT

United Kingdom

View Map

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