Free

WEBdeLDN #21 - Horror Stories

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Condé Nast International

The Adelphi

1-11 John Adam Street

London

WC2N 6HT

United Kingdom

View Map

Event description

Description

Our next meetup will see a bunch of different speakers share their personal "horror stories of software development".

A special evening filled of lightning talks about the challenges and lessons learned in a hard way, about the experiences and tribulations, the trials and sometimes the failures of our profession.

With a smile on our faces, of course.


Schedule of the evening

18:30 - Doors will open.
19:00 - Horror stories from our speakers (lightning talks)
19:45 - Food and drinks.
20:00 - More horror stories from our speakers
20:45 - End of the meetup




Tales after midnight

A friend once said: "There are 2 types of engineers. Those that have broken production and those who are about to break production".

Tales after midnight is an anthology of modern horror cautionary stories, including "Don't deploy that code", "The CSS of Doom", "Face off" et al.
It's really important to be ready, in case it was you the pager was tolling for, just after midnight.

"Based on true stories" – me
"Not your typical horror stories" – also me
"The tales are varied as they are interesting and it promises to entertain readers from all types of horror genres" – not me, but also not necessarily about this talk

Marco Cedaro

Marco Cedaro

Tech Lead at Condé Nast International

Webmaster before it was cool, pixel pusher, JavaScript-something, conference organiser, father of two, but mostly known for yelling at clouds.

Twitter: @cedmax




Tweet my wedding dress

After attending EMF camp, I fell in love with the tweetable LED inflatable bunny. I wondered if it would be possible to take the idea of LEDs controlled by twitter and put them all over something wearable, in this case my wedding dress!

My talk will go over the tech I used (suitable for absolute beginners), the (many!) mistakes that I made and the lessons I learnt along the way. From learning to use the twitter API, writing my own API, coding for an arduino and wiring the whole thing up to the worst bit, THE SEWING. I aim to spread the message that it is ok to f**k up, that everyone does it and that if you keep trying and keep asking for help, you can make silly things too.

Jo Franchetti

Jo Franchetti

Jo is a Web Developer Advocate for Samsung Internet who is passionate about good CSS. She’s got 6 years experience as a front end developer and has worked in various parts of the tech industry from startups, agencies, charities to large organisations. She is also mentor and organiser at codebar.io where she is able to action her passion not only for teaching good use of the web but also for improving the diversity and inclusivity of the tech industry.

Twitter: @ThisIsJoFrank

Website: medium.com/@jofranchetti




Melting point

Does a server survive in a container in a car park under a hot summer's sun?

Let's discover it together.

Daniele Esposti

Daniele Esposti

Data Platform Team Lead working with Python, JavaScript and Rust on Big Data projects and algorithms at Badoo. His background includes DevOps, backend and desktop applications (when desktop was cool :-) ).

Twitter: @expobrain




Quick prod releases and what can inevitably happen

How a single HTML change can cause an e-commerce website, used by millions every day, to generate zero revenue for 2 hours.

Joseph Shambrook

Joseph Shambrook

Front End Web Developer at AND Digital and a general geek

Twitter: @J_se_h




Can you break democracy with technology?

(aka, how were we doing it before Facebook)

In the NGO world there are many ways to define the use of technology for development or for social good. Generally speaking the Tech4Good world encompasses everything from using technology for election monitoring, to delivering cash to refugees using mobile phones. But what does it really mean to use technology in under-resources places? Are NGOs really able to use Tech? And are techies really ready to work with NGOs and to put the imperative of do no harm above any other?

In this talk I will go over a couple of examples of Tech4Good that will make you think Black Mirror was an optimistic vision of what awaits us in the future.

Anahi Ayala Iacucci

Anahi Ayala Iacucci

For the past 10 years, she has been consulting for NGOs and international organizations on the use of new technologies and crisis mapping. She worked for 3 years as Media and Innovation Advisor in the Africa Region, dealing with projects ranging from health to humanitarian aid, to environmental adaptation. She has worked on tech for good project all over the world, from Iraq to Afghanistan, from China to Ukraine. In 2015 She was in Liberia working on the Ebola Response and after that, she lived and worked for 2 years in South Sudan. Right now she lives in London, still works on humanitarian response and she still is a bit of a geek.

Twitter: @anahi_ayala

Website: anahiayala.com




How to break the Vogue homepage twice in two days

A tale of taking down the Vogue homepage.

Twice. In two days. For two different reasons. And also a coffee machine.

Why did this happen, and what did we learn?

Michelle Garrett

Michelle Garrett

I'm a Software Engineer and Developer Advocate at Condé Nast International in London, working with React, Node and GraphQL. I also organise Node Girls London, which hosts free JavaScript workshops for gender minorities in tech.

Twitter: @msmichellegar




The outsourcing Veil of Maya

Outsourcing software development can be such a dysfunctional way to go that in some case it completely flips the ends of ethics. A bank, an outsourced team, a few internal product owners and me, staring at the headlights like a deer: a short war story to provoke some thought.

Jacopo Romei

Jacopo Romei

Jacopo wrote his first automated test in 2003 and then never stopped working on agile and lean processes. He founded two service companies and one product company. Worked as an agile coach in eBay Italia and has been a member of the EODF’s board (European Organisation Design Forum) in 2015. He wrote a lot on refactoring and TDD, including a book on refactoring published by Apress. In 2017 he published “Extreme Contracts”.

Twitter: @jacoporomei

Website: jacoporomei.com




"Going responsive" gone unresponsive

Not so many years ago I joined a company that had a legacy website that needed to go responsive; however, what was supposed to be a reskin of the frontend became a big rewrite, and we all know what happens with big rewrites.

Mattia Tommasone

Mattia Tommasone

Developer Advocate at Google, spent 10 years writing code for Italian companies then moved to London.
Also spent more than 15 years coaching kids at football, even more years writing about electronic music, and once had an Arduino controller to make his washing machine tweet when it was done washing.

Twitter: @raibaz

Website: raibaz.it



Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Condé Nast International

The Adelphi

1-11 John Adam Street

London

WC2N 6HT

United Kingdom

View Map

Save This Event

Event Saved