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Women in STEM 2020, you really can have it all.

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Christopher Ingold Building, Nyholm room

20 Gordon Street

London

WC1H 0AJ

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Join us to hear stories from women in STEM who manage to have it all.....

About this Event

The Department of Chemistry EDI Committee invites all final year undergraduates and PhD students to hear the stories of how several Women in Chemistry perused their careers in STEM and had it all, from children, good work-life balance, research careers and careers in industry.

Schedule:

12.00pm Lunch

1.00pm Opening talk by Dr David Rowley, Co-Chair EDI

1.05pm How to manage your work/life balance by Dr Anna Regoutz

1.15pm Experience of Maternity Leave by Dr Lorena Ruiz-Perez

1.25pm Options after a PhD by Dr Gemma-Louise Davies

1.35pm Life as a Researcher by Professor Katherine Holt

1.45pm Working in Industry by Dr Emma Newton

1.55pm Questions from the Audience

2.15pm Networking and refreshments

If you have any dietary requirements, please email : chem.edi@ucl.ac.uk

More about the panel:

Dr Anna Regoutz

Anna Regoutz is a Lecturer in Materials Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry at UCL. She is a CAMS-UK Fellow and holds a Visiting Scientist position at Diamond Light Source. Her research focus lies on bulk, thin film, and nano materials for application in devices, including power electronics, photovoltaics, and biosensors. Her interests include novel growth methods for high quality thin films, nanostructured layers, and nanostructures of inorganic materials with a focus on metal oxides. She works on developing and advancing X-ray spectroscopy methods for bulk materials and surfaces/interfaces in electronic devices and concentrates on using and developing both laboratory- and synchrotron-based spectroscopic methods to study in particular the electronic structure in oxide heterostructures. Anna uses her combined expertise in deposition and characterisation of these materials to understand and tune the materials’ electronic and optical characteristics to ultimately improve existing device concepts and develop novel device applications.

Anna received her BSc (2009) and Dipl. Ing. (2010) from the Graz University of Technology, Austria. She conducted her D.Phil. research in Inorganic Chemistry between 2010 and 2014 under the supervision of Prof. Russell Egdell at the University of Oxford, UK, and Trinity College, Oxford, UK. She is a co-director for the Centre for Doctoral Training in the Advanced Characterisation of Materials, which is joint between UCL, Imperial and Trinity College Dublin. In 2018 she was awarded the Student Academic Choice Award for Best Teaching for Undergraduates at Imperial. In 2019 she was awarded the element Praseodymium in the Periodic Table of Chemists by the IUPAC. Anna is an Associate Editor in the Understanding the Earth and its Resources section of Frontiers for Young Minds, an open-access scientific journal written by scientists and reviewed by children.

Dr Lorena Ruiz-Perez

Lorena Ruiz-Perez completed her undergraduate degree in Physics in Spain and later on earned her Ph.D. in Polymer Physics at University of Sheffield.. Following her Ph.D. she worked as a PDRA in the departments of Engineering Materials, Chemistry, and Biomedical Science at the University of Sheffield.  In 2014 she moved to London where she took some time off research to teach Maths and Physics in secondary schools, disseminate subject expertise, and champion university access.  Since 2016 she manages the EPSRC/JEOL Centre of Liquid Phase Electron Microscopy at UCL where has focused on developing and establishing novel techniques for in-situ transmission electron microscopy imaging of soft organic materials and biological systems in liquid phase. Lorena has two children, aged 6 and 10 and appreciates flexible working patterns.

Dr Gemma-Louise Davies

Gemma-Louise graduated from Trinity College Dublin (Ireland) with a Degree in Natural Sciences (Mod. Chemistry) and remained there to undertake a PhD in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (awarded in 2011). Following a brief industry-supported Postdoctoral Fellowship in Trinity College Dublin, Gemma-Louise moved to the University of Oxford as a Postdoctoral Research Associate before she was awarded a Global Research Fellowship at the University of Warwick in 2013. She joined the Department of Chemistry at University College London in July 2017 as Lecturer in Materials Chemistry and Programme Director of the MSc in Materials for Energy and the Environment. Gemma-Louise is also an Associate Editor for the RSC's Journal of Materials Chemistry B and Materials Advances journals. She is expecting her first child in May of this year!

Professor Katherine Holt

Katherine was born and raised in Durham and educated at a local comprehensive school. She studied for an MChem at the University of Oxford and then stayed on to do a DPhil (PhD) with Prof John Foord. Her DPhil project was on the properties and applications of boron-doped diamond electrodes, so while she started out as a materials / surface scientist she 'accidentally' became an electrochemist. To cement this accidental career move she somehow, without much planning, ended up in the research group of Prof Allen Bard at the University of Texas at Austin. Bard is sometimes called the 'grandfather of modern electrochemistry' and wrote the ubiquitous textbook on the subject. Katherine managed to fill in some of the massive gaps in her electrochemical knowledge in the two years spent in Austin and worked on diverse topics such as the development of an oxygen sensing electrode and the antimicrobial properties of silver. After this she returned to the UK and arrived at UCL with a Ramsay Fellowship, which she followed up with an EPSRC Advanced Research Fellowship. She has now worked at UCL Chemistry for 15 years and is Professor of Physical Chemistry. She still considers herself an 'accidental electrochemist'.

Dr Emma Newton

Following a Chemistry PhD at UCL, Emma began her career as a materials scientist developing gas sensors for consumer electronics at a start-up, Cambridge CMOS Sensors, which was acquired by a large multinational for the sensing device Emma produced. She then joined Dyson and contributed to the build of new R&D facilities as well as producing technology road maps for gas detection products for consumer appliances. Emma then sat on the technology board for a start-up based in the US, developing sensing devices for the oil and gas sector. In September 2017, Emma joined QinetiQ where she is Team Lead of Novel Materials working on developing new materials for commercial products.

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Christopher Ingold Building, Nyholm room

20 Gordon Street

London

WC1H 0AJ

United Kingdom

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