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Women, Work and the First World War.

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Highland Archive Centre

Bught Road

Inverness

IV3 5SS

United Kingdom

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High Life Highland and the University of the Highlands and Islands are co-hosting this open and free study day with the First World War Centenary Partnership, led by Imperial War Museums, Gateways to the First World War, Living Legacies 1914-18 and Reflections on the Centenary of the FWW. The aim of this event is to bring community and academic audiences together to learn more about current research on Women and Work in the First World War, the archival and digital resources available to those planning to conduct their own research and centenary funding opportunities for community projects. It will also provide an opportunity for organisations to reflect on centenary activity so far in order to shape and inform future work, and will provide opportunities for discussion about best practice, planning for forthcoming anniversaries and networking.

Programme

10:15 Registration

10:30 Welcome and introductions: Lorna Steele (High Life Highland) and Liz Robertson (IWM)

10:45 Panel 1 – Women and Work in the First World War: Prof Lucy Noakes (University of Essex), Dr Emma Hanna (University of Kent) and Dr Helen Brooks (University of Kent), chaired by Dr Sam Carroll (Gateways to the First World War) See details below.

11:30 Coffee break

11:45 Panel 2 – Women and Medicine in the First World War: Dr Patricia Whatley (University of Dundee) and Dr Helen Bryers (University of Aberdeen) chaired by Dr Iain Robertson (University of the Highlands and Islands)

12:30 Lunch – and a chance to look at exhibition displays and tour the archive. Tours are limited and pre-bookable and are available at 12:45 and 13:15

13:45 Film screening and talk: on the MARRI (Medals All Round Research Initiative) Project, including female stories uncovered and dramatized: Dr Michelle Young (Living Legacies)

14:10 1914 monologue and Q&A session: ‘Extract from the 1914 play The Hem of the Flag by Kenelm Foss, with discussion’: Dr Helen Brooks (University of Kent)

14:30 Workshops – attendees have a choice from selection:

  • Reflections on the First World War: focus group and discussion of centenary activities – Prof Lucy Noakes (University of Essex)

  • FWW Community heritage project development and funding workshop – Dr Sam Carroll (Gateways to the First World War)

  • Interpreting historical research into a digital resource – Elaine Reid (Living Legacies)

  • Researching women in the First World War through Lives of the First World War – Catherine Long (IWM)

15:30 HLF presentation – funding First World War community heritage projects

15:45 Closing remarks: Katie Childs, IWM

16:00 End

Later in the evening (18.00 to 20.00) at Inverness College IWM and UHI are hosting ‘ Women on Film in the First World War' a selection of three short films showcasing the remarkable stories of women working at on the home front and on the front-lines of war. Booking is separate and required. Details can be found here:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/women-on-film-in-the-first-world-war-womenswork100-tickets-44252960797

Panel 1 will be a "Question-time" type session. The speakers welcome questions from the audience, so do come prepared to ask something. The paragraphs below outline each speaker's expertise in the area of Women, Work and the First World War.

Dr Helen Brooks (University of Kent)

Throughout the FWW women were an active presence in the British theatre industry, working in increased numbers both on stage and behind the scenes. This work was a continuation of women’s long history within the workplace of British theatre, although their presence as carpenters, stagehands and technicians was a new development. On stage, whilst more plays were written and performed with mostly or entirely female casts however, often the ways women were represented failed to reflect wartime changes in women’s roles.

Dr Emma Hanna (University of Kent)

It is not well-known that there were many women civilians who worked very near to the front lines on the Western Front. The majority of these women serve with a range of voluntary-aid organisations such as the Young Men's Christian Association, the Red Cross, and the Salvation Army. Their roles ranged from staffing canteens to taking music and education to the troops. Research is now uncovering how women played pivotal roles in helping to improve servicemen's physical and emotional/spiritual well-being and morale near the front lines, and of how the women perceived their wartime duties in terms of christian philanthropy and patriotic national service.

Professor Lucy Noakes (University of Essex)

In 1917 the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps was formed, providing women workers to work in support positions with the army. Although this work was, in some ways, revolutionary, as the women wore khaki, and worked in close contact with the troops both in Britain and close to the Front in France and Belgium, in other ways it reinforced existing ideas about gender roles in wartime. So was women’s military work really as ‘liberating’ as has often been assumed?

https://www.highlifehighland.com/archives-service

https://www.uhi.ac.uk/en

www.1914.org/partnership

http://www.gatewaysfww.org.uk

http://www.livinglegacies1914-18.ac.uk

http://reflections1418.exeter.ac.uk

Image: Members of the Women's Land Army during the First World War © IWM (Q 30679)

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Date and Time

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Highland Archive Centre

Bught Road

Inverness

IV3 5SS

United Kingdom

View Map

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