Free

YorkTalks 2020 - Session Four

Event Information

Share this event

Date and Time

Location

Location

Ron Cooke Hub

Campus East

University of York

York

YO10 5GE

United Kingdom

Event description

Description

Photography and video recording will take place during YorkTalks, which may be used for marketing purposes by the University of York. If you have any concerns or would prefer not to feature, please email marketing-support@york.ac.uk. For further information about how we use photgraphy or video which includes you please see our privacy notice.


Challenging the face race: why we need a new framework to evaluate and manage the emotional impact of facial transplantation - Fay Bound Alberti, Department of History

Since the first face transplant in 2005, the race to lead this elite surgical field has accelerated, with medical teams around the world participating in what remains a novel and high risk clinical practice. UKRI Future Leaders Fellow Dr Fay Bound Alberti is a researcher who works on the histories of emotion, the body, medicine and cosmetic surgery.

Her latest project, About Face, challenges media reports on face transplantation, as she explores the emotional contexts of face transplant surgery and shows how surgical innovation can outpace our capacity to cope with the ethical and emotional dimensions. In collaboration with clinicians, her work will inform UK clinical practice with new tools for evaluating the emotional dimension of this transformative surgery.

Content Advisory - Please be aware that this presentation may contain images of facial trauma and surgery which could be distressing for some audience members.

Bodies, bugs and hospital architectures: Designing healthcare for the post-antibiotic age - Nik Brown, Department of Sociology

The World Health Organisation identifies antimicrobial resistance (AMR) as one of the greatest threats today to global health, security and prosperity. Social anthropologist Professor Nik Brown heads a multidisciplinary team investigating how contemporary hospital design could actually be making the problem worse rather than better. In the ‘pre-antibiotic era’ infections were managed in healthcare buildings designed to maximise sunlight, fresh air, open space and access to the natural environment.

He will argue that the increasing use of antibiotics, from the mid-20th century, made possible the construction of densely-packed, high-rise, monolithic, industrial-scale hospitals. These are now characteristically enclosed, poorly lit, sealed and artificially ventilated buildings where infections are managed pharmacologically rather than spatially and environmentally. His team looks at healthcare through a much broader lens to challenge design assumptions and think creatively using examples from history, from specialist areas of treatment and from other country contexts.

Caring about the evidence: changing the face of palliative care for children in the UK - Lorna Fraser, Department of Health Sciences

With twice as many children suffering life-threatening illnesses as suffer from type 1 diabetes – and just 15 specialist paediatric palliative care consultants across the country – Dr Lorna Fraser and her team are leading a research programme to provide a better evidence base for the support these children and their families really need. Generously funded by the Martin House children’s hospice, this work follows hot on the heels of Dr Fraser’s research in Scotland, which contributed to a £30m investment in children’s palliative care north of the border.

It also runs in parallel to the independent evaluation she is carrying out into NHS England’s pilot for a ‘managed clinical network’ for palliative care that will be rolled out across the country. From the personal stories of children and their parents through to big picture epidemiological studies, York is helping change the face of children’s palliative care.

The punk professor’s legacy: from ‘faith based political wheezes’ to health policy informed by economic analysis, data and evidence - Maria Goddard, Centre for Health Economics

Professor Maria Goddard, Director of the Centre for Health Economics (CHE), reveals how her 60-strong team of researchers is shaping the health landscape at a national and global level: from developing robust tools for more effective, efficient and equitable healthcare here in the UK, through to research collaborations with academics and policymakers across Europe, America, Africa and Asia.

She will show that, while former Health Secretary Ken Clarke may have scoffed at taking advice from a newly formed research centre led by ‘a punk professor’ in the 1980s, Ken Clarke’s successors and counterparts across the world frequently seek advice from CHE researchers as they grapple with important questions about how best to spend a global $7.3 trillion healthcare budget.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you require more than 5 tickets, please contact the Events Team who will be happy to help.

Please ensure you use the correct email address as this is where your ticket will be sent. If you do not provide the correct address, you will not receive the acknowledgement email or ticket.

Share with friends

Date and Time

Location

Ron Cooke Hub

Campus East

University of York

York

YO10 5GE

United Kingdom

Save This Event

Event Saved