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Ron Cooke Hub

Campus East

University of York

York

YO10 5GE

United Kingdom

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Session Three - 1.45pm to 3.15pm

Failing the future - childhood in an unequal world - Kate Pickett, Department of Health Sciences
In 2007, a Unicef report claimed that child wellbeing was lower in the UK than in any other rich, developed country. Is growing up in the UK really so awful for our children? Social epidemiologist and co-author of The Inner Level, Professor Kate Pickett, will draw on international, national and local evidence, including the ground-breaking Born in Bradford study, to reveal the true state of our nation’s children and answer the question of whether we are failing the next generation and risking all of our futures.

Measuring the risks of the banks – ten years since the crash - Alexander McNeil, The York Management School
In the decade since the global financial crisis of 2007-08, the regulation of banks has been the focus of national financial supervisors. Professor Alexander McNeil has been helping regulators across the world to sharpen the tools by which `good banks’ and `bad banks’ may be distinguished according to their ability to quantify their own trading risks. The author of the financial bible on financial risk management, Professor McNeil will talk about the models banks use to quantify their capital requirements, and the process of continual monitoring to which they are subjected known as ‘backtesting.’ He will show how, from the point of view of a mathematical statistician, the methods used to evaluate the results of these backtests remain quite rudimentary.

How the people we work with can shape our careers - Thomas Cornelissen, Department of Economics and Related Studies
No one would be surprised to discover that their wages and career prospects depend on their education, skills, occupation, and the type of employer they work for. But does our labour market success also depend in important ways on those we work with and alongside? Do good co-workers make us more productive, improving our earnings and career prospects? Could this be because we learn from them or because they motivate us to work harder? Professor Thomas Cornelissen will talk about what we know about these questions and how his own research, based on administrative labour market records of millions of workers and co-workers, has advanced this active field of research in economics.

Realising the power of nature for mental health - Piran White, Department of Environment and Geography
Around one seventh of the world’s population is affected by a mental disorder and the numbers are increasing. In the UK, one in six people experience mental health problems. The environment in which people live has long been recognised as an important determinant of their health, but the importance of nature as part of this environment has been overlooked. Professor Piran White shows how natural hazards such as flooding can be damaging to mental health, yet other aspects, such as green space and biodiversity, bring substantial benefits to health and wellbeing. The power of nature in influencing mental health is only starting to be realised, and presents new opportunities for nature-based interventions to reduce mental disorders, while also helping to improve biodiversity and reduce pollution.

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Date and Time

Location

Ron Cooke Hub

Campus East

University of York

York

YO10 5GE

United Kingdom

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