£50 – £60

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Premature Birth Conference

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Birmingham City University

4 Cardigan Street

Curzon Building

Birmingham

B4 7BD

United Kingdom

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INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSEPCTIVES ON EARLY CARE AND EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN BORN PREMATURELY

Each year in England, around 10,000 children are born very preterm (at less than 32 weeks gestation) and a further 60,000 are born moderately preterm (at 32-36 weeks gestation). The number of preterm births has increased in the last two decades, and more preterm children are surviving due to improved neonatal care. However, the prevalence of cognitive, behavioural and emotional problems in preterm populations has not changed. In particular, children born preterm have been found to experience specific learning problems including difficulties with mathematics, visual-spatial skills, memory and attention.

The Faculty of Health, Education and Life Sciences Research Centre for the Study of Practice and Culture in Education (CSPACE) and Centre for Social Care, Health and Related Research (C-SCHaRR) in collaboration with the Champion Centre, New Zealand http://www.championcentre.org.nz/ and the European Association on Early Childhood Intervention (Eurlyaid) http://www.eurlyaid.eu/ are pleased to invite you to this research and practice conference. The aims of the conference are to share current and recent research undertaken by Birmingham City University and its strategic partners, raise awareness of the short and long term consequences of premature birth and develop a shared interdisciplinary understanding of how to support children and families in the current socio-political-economic climate. Booking available here https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/interdisciplinary-perspectives-on-premature-birth-conference-tickets-33332879540

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS FOR POSTER PRESENTATIONS:

If you would like to present a poster, please email your abstract to carolyn.blackburn@bcu.ac.uk. Please include details of the study aims, questions, methods, theoretical framework, findings and conclusion and your own contact details.

PROGRAMME

9.00 – 9.30 Arrival and Registration

9.30 – 9.45 Introduction and housekeeping - Dr Carolyn Blackburn

9.45 – 10.30 – Still different: short and long term impacts of prematurity in early childhood – Dr Susan Foster-Cohen

10.30 – 11.15 One year on: parents’ reflection on their child’s development and adaptation to family life one year after preterm birth: a qualitative study – Dr Merryl Harvey

11.15 – 11.45 Coffee and networking break – poster presentations

11.45– 12.00 A Fathers experience of premature birth and neonatal care – Kelvin Dawson

12.00 – 12.15 BLISS charity for children born premature or sick

12.15 – 1.00 Every feed matters: Developmentally supportive feeding on the NICU – Alexendra Connolly and Rachel Evans

1.00 - 1.45 Lunch – poster presentations

1.45 – 2.15 Professor Barry Carpenter, CBE: Premature Birth and Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities, Themes from an International Research Project

2.15 – 2.45 Parents experiences of early care and education for children born prematurely – Dr Carolyn Blackburn

2.45 – 3.15 Supporting infants and young children born prematurely – the Champion Centre Model – Dr Susan Foster-Cohen

3.15 – 3.30 pm Questions and final reflections on the day

IN CONTEXT:

Still different: short and long term impacts of prematurity in early childhood, Dr. Susan Foster-Cohen

This presentation will explore the impact on both infant and parent of premature birth during the first five years of life. Using a biopsychosocial systems framework, it is possible to see that even when the impact of prematurity seems to have been overcome, children entering school are still different from full term children in ways that need to be understood and supported for the best learning outcomes.

One year on: parents’ reflection on their child’s development and adaptation to family life one year after preterm birth: a qualitative study, Dr. Merryl Harvey

This study was undertaken as part of a larger programme of research which explored the use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) to predict the long term outcomes of babies born before 33 weeks gestation (ePrime study). The analysis of interviews with parents provides insight to the longer term impact on parents of having a baby born preterm and the ways that families adjust and cope with a child’s specific needs during the first year.

A Fathers Experience of premature birth and neonatal care, Kelvin Dawson

This talk will explore Kelvin’s experiences and emotions from the moment his wife phoned him at work at 23 weeks and 2 days to say her waters have broken to birth and then through 4 months in Neonatal Care, coming home on oxygen to date.

Premature Birth and Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities, Themes from an International Research Project

This presentation will discuss themes from an international interdisciplinary Department for Education funded project that established the nationally recognised definition of Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities mentioned in the recent Rochford Review of assessment for children with Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties.

Parents experiences of early care and education for young children born prematurely Dr. Carolyn Blackburn

This presentation will discuss findings from a survey of 200 parents and interviews with 12 parents relating to parents’ experiences of having a child born prematurely. Parents’ experiences of neo-natal care, family and professional support on discharge from hospital, attending parent and toddler groups, early care and education and transition to school will be discussed and implications for the early years workforce in terms of training and continuing professional development will be highlighted.

Every feed matters: Developmentally supportive feeding on the NICU Alexendra Connolly and Rachel Evans

Babies who are born prematurely and/or with medical complications are at high risk of having feeding difficulties in early childhood. Negative patterns created by feeding induced stress are formed when daily care focuses on the volume of milk taken rather than the baby's developmental readiness for feeds. Neonatal Speech and Language Therapists have an integral role in supporting parents and the wider team to recognise signs of readiness and respond to the infant's cues during feeding. This presentation will highlight the potential effects of stress during feeding and the possible impact on neurodevelopmental outcomes. We will explain how the Speech and Language Therapist can work with the neonatal team to develop positive feeding practice on the neonatal unit

Supporting infants and young children born prematurely: The Champion Centre model, Dr. Susan Foster-Cohen

The Champion Centre in Christchurch, New Zealand has been providing wrap-around therapy services for infants and young children born prematurely for almost 30 years. The programme takes a biopsychosocial systems approach and provides multi-disciplinary support to both infant and family, tailored to each child’s and family’s needs. This presentation will describe this programme and the outcomes it achieves.

Biographies:

Dr. Susan Foster-Cohen is the Director of the Champion Centre, a multi-disciplinary early intervention centre for children with developmental delays and disabilities where she combines programme administration with research and advocacy on behalf of infants and children with developmental delays and their families. She is a Visiting Fellow in Interdisciplinary Practice and Research with Families at Birmingham City University.

Dr Merryl Harvey is a Reader in Nursing and her main role at Birmingham City University is as Chair of the Faculty Academic Ethics Committee. She is also co-lead of the Family Health Research Cluster, research coordinator for the Department of Children and Young People’s Health and co-lead of the ‘Elizabeth Bryan Multiple Births Centre’.

Kelvin Dawson is from the Midlands and married to Carley. They have one daughter Charlotte who was born at 25 weeks and 2 days. He works as a Supplier Manager for Royal Mail Fleet. He also works as a volunteer on the BLISS volunteer helpline and is a member of the parental board for a number of neonatal research studies.

Professor Barry Carpenter Professor Barry Carpenter is Honorary Professor at the Universities of Worcester (UK), Limerick (Ireland), Hamburg (Germany), and Flinders, (Australia) . In a career spanning more than 30 years, Barry has held the leadership positions of Academic Director, Chief Executive, Principal, Headteacher, Inspector of Schools and Director of the Centre for Special Education at Westminster College, Oxford. In 2009, he was appointed by the Secretary of State for Education as Director of the Children with Complex Learning Difficulties and Disabilities Research Project. Since completing that research, Barry has overseen the development of a national project developing on-line training materials for teachers of children with severe, profound and complex learning disabilities.

Dr. Carolyn Blackburn is a Senior Research Fellow in the Centre for the Study of Practice and Culture in Education at Birmingham City University where is researching parents experiences of pre-term birth and children’s right to make choices and engage in playful activities in restricted environments at Birmingham Women’s and Children’s Hospital. She is Deputy Chair of the Faculty Academic Ethics Committee, a Churchill Early Years Prevention and Intervention Fellow and a Board Member of Eurlyaid.

Alexandra Connolly is a neonatal Speech and Language Therapist with Barts Health in London where she works with the neonatal team to support and develop feeding practices. She is currently part of a national working group with the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists who are working towards improving standards and clinical care in Speech and Language Therapy on neonatal units. Alexandra has recently joined the Neonatal Nurses Association Special Interest Education and Research group and has a special interest in working with nurses to improve feeding experiences for both the infant and the family.

Rachel Evans is a Senior Specialist Speech and Language Therapist working at Birmingham Children’s Hospital; part of her role is to work with the neonatal population, specifically with patients requiring surgical intervention. She regularly takes part in neonatal ward rounds to develop the provision of Developmental Care to this population. Rachel is currently part of a national working group with the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists working towards improving standards and clinical care in Speech and Language Therapy on neonatal units.

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Birmingham City University

4 Cardigan Street

Curzon Building

Birmingham

B4 7BD

United Kingdom

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