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Mathematical Institute (Lecture Room 3)

Radcliffe Observatory Quarter

Woodstock Road

Oxford

OX2 6GG

United Kingdom

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The fourth QBIOX Colloquium will take place on Friday 10th November (5th week) and feature talks from Professor Paul Riley (Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Genetics / BHF Oxbridge Centre for Regenerative Medicine, https://www.dpag.ox.ac.uk/research/riley-group) and Professor Eleanor Stride (Institute of Biomedical Engineering, http://www.ibme.ox.ac.uk/research/non-invasive-therapy-drug-delivery/people/dr-eleanor-stride).

1400-1445 - Paul Riley, "Enroute to mending broken hearts".

1445-1530 - Eleanor Stride, "TBC".

1530-1630 - Networking and refreshments.

We hope to see you there. As ever, tickets are not necessary, but registering to attend will help us with numbers for catering.

Abstracts

Paul Riley - "En route to mending broken hearts".
We adopt the paradigm of understanding how the heart develops during pregnancy as a first principal to inform on adult heart repair and regeneration. Our target for cell-based repair is the epicardium and epicardium-derived cells (EPDCs) which line the outside of the forming heart and contribute vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells to the coronary vasculature, interstitial fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes. The epicardium can also act as a source of signals to condition the growth of the underlying embryonic heart muscle. In the adult heart, whilst the epicardium is retained, it is effectively quiescent. We have sought to extrapolate the developmental potential of the epicardium to the adult heart following injury by stimulating dormant epicardial cells to give rise to new muscle and vasculature. In parallel, we seek to modulate the local environment into which the new cells emerge: a cytotoxic mixture of inflammation and fibrosis which prevents cell engraftment and integration with survived heart tissue. To this end we manipulate the lymphatic vessels in the heart given that, elsewhere in the body, the lymphatics survey the immune system and modulate inflammation at peripheral injury sites. We recently described the development of the cardiac lymphatic vasculature and revealed in the adult heart that they undergo increased vessel sprouting (lymphangiogenesis) in response to injury, to improve function, remodelling and fibrosis. We are currently investigating whether increased lymphangiogenesis functions to clear immune cells and constrain the reparative response for optimal healing.

Eleanor Stride - "TBC"

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Date and Time

Location

Mathematical Institute (Lecture Room 3)

Radcliffe Observatory Quarter

Woodstock Road

Oxford

OX2 6GG

United Kingdom

View Map

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